Bonsai Kid!

…Shaping the world!

Japanese artist breathes new life into bonsai May 18, 2007

Filed under: daily article — Newstudy @ 12:27 am

by Elaine Lies of Reuters website
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The tiny trees used in the Japanese art of bonsai may live for centuries, but the ancient traditions that produce them are being given a modern twist by female artist Kaori Yamada.

Bonsai — the art of cultivating miniature trees — has long been seen in Japan as a hobby only for elderly men. But Yamada, who hails from a family of bonsai artists with a history spanning more than 150 years, has managed to make it trendy.

“When I started this job, we were a bit worried about whether the art of bonsai would last since the people who took part in it were dying off,” she told Reuters.
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Saika Bonsai – The Female’s choice May 17, 2007

Filed under: daily article — Newstudy @ 11:00 pm

by Tokiko Oba of The Daily Yomiuri website
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In Japan, bonsai was once considered a hobby for elderly men. But that image has changed in recent years, with a new type of bonsai winning fans among women. Bonsai artist Kaori Yamada is one of the key contributors to the art form’s newfound popularity.

“People are busy today, and they’re always in a hurry, not wanting to waste a single second. But bonsai slows you down and makes you concentrate on the plant in front of you. Besides, it takes months for a tree to bud or bloom. There’s joy in the waiting, and I think that’s what many women have found pleasurable,” the 28-year-old Yamada said.
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saika.jpg
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Bonsai projects for 2007

Filed under: Blogging — Newstudy @ 1:39 am

Deciduous/Flowering
Pomegranate
Trident Maples


Tropical/Indoor
Fukien Tea
Ficus Retusa
Ficus Tigerbark
Hawaiian Umbrella
Jades

 
Evergreen/Conifer
Serissa Snow Rose
Shimpaku Junipers
Chinese Sweet Plum
Pines
Azaleas
Green Mound Junipers

 

Bonsai Samples 2 May 15, 2007

Filed under: Tree Samples — Newstudy @ 1:44 am

sweet-plum.jpg  serissa-snow-rose.jpg  fukien_tea_tree.jpg  bonsai_ligustrum.jpg  bald-cypress.jpg

 

The art of making a bonsai from a shrub May 14, 2007

Filed under: Techniques — Newstudy @ 11:04 pm

Many people are considering bonsai simply as a tree, but it’s not. Bonsai is a peace of art, the recreation of nature in a miniature style, a secret wish to exalt the nature and also to bring the nature into the living space, just accomplishing the outside growing conditions.


You can have your own bonsai, but you have to love it and put your entire feelings in caring it, because you have to know that bonsai is a pretentious and very spoilt tree.
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Plastic Pots for Bonsai

Filed under: Back to basics — Newstudy @ 10:45 pm

Are Plastic Pots OK For My Bonsai?   This is a very common question we get asked.   Plastic pots are absolutely fine for the early training of your plant.

We know that they are not as pleasing to the eye as clay pots, but if you purchase them form a good supplier then they will have been carefully designed to ensure both good growth and good drainage.

As clay pots have a porous texture that allows the roots to breathe even when the soil is packed tight, tey provide a greater advantage over the plastic pots.

The foundation of growing a good bonsai tree in a pot, before the days of plastic pots, were firm planting and a soil based compost.

For the more advanced specimens, bonsai pots will of course be needed these need and must be chosen with great care, matching the pot or the dish to your tree.

The main reason for growing your bonsai trees in training pots is that they will then have excellent root systems to make for easy establishment.

 

Suiseki May 13, 2007

Filed under: Suiseki — Newstudy @ 12:00 am

Suiseki are small stones shaped by nature, unaltered by man, which suggest familiar landscapes such as mountains, islands, waterfalls, shorelines or seascapes.   Further, to be classified as suiseki, the material must be dense, dark in color and possess a subtle patina.   These stones are displayed in hand carved wooden bases, called daiza, or in trays of sand, called suiban, where the sand represents the earth’s surface, either land or water.   To complete the display, the stone and its surroundings are shown on a low table or slab of wood,called jiban.
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aaSuiseki and Bonsai
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